How I Learned to Drive
Paperback, 120 pages ISBN: 9781559365642Publication Date:
14 Jun 2018
Size: 215mm x 135mm£14.99
First Staged:
Vineyard Theatre, off-Broadway, US, March 1997

How I Learned to Drive

By Paula Vogel

Paperback £14.99

  • Pulitzer Prize for Drama - 1998

Paula Vogel's How I Learned to Drive is a Lolita-like tale of female sexual awakening under the watchful eye – and hands – of a largely sympathetic 'uncle'.

It was premiered off-Broadway in March 1997, and went on to win the 1998 Pulitzer Prize.

Press Quotes

'With subtle humor and teasing erotic encounters, Vogel addresses the dangerous intersections of teenage temptation. She also paints a richly poetic and picturesque landscape… The play is a potent and convincing comment on a taboo subject, and its impact sneaks up on its audience.'

Variety

'The play is steeped in a gentle lyricism we associate with nostalgic portraits of American youth. The tone, the setting, the characters seem at first so familiar, so, well, normal, that it’s only by degrees that we sense the poison within the pastels. By then we feel both locked into, and complicit with, this portrait of a warping relationship. That’s the art of Drive.'

New York Times

'One of the best plays of the decade'

USA Today

'How I Learned to Drive is a tremendous achievement, genuine and genuinely disturbing… This is, quite simply, the sweetest and most forgiving play ever written about child abuse… Vogel’s delicate tactic makes sense not only as a way to redouble the dramatic effect, but as a representation of reality, a perfect case of the form fitting the subject.'

Village Voice
Paperback, 120 pages ISBN: 9781559365642Publication Date:
14 Jun 2018
Size: 215mm x 135mm£14.99

Also by Paula Vogel:

Indecent
A Civil War Christmas
The Mineola Twins
The Mammary Plays
The Baltimore Waltz and other plays
The Long Christmas Ride Home

Go to author page...

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