Scot-Free
Paperback, 275 pages ISBN: 9781854590176Publication Date:
3 May 1990
Size: 197mm x 130mm£10.99 £8.79You save £2.20 (20%)

Scot-Free

New Scottish Plays

Edited by Alasdair Cameron

Paperback £10.99£8.79

A collection of seven plays from Scottish writers, reflecting the upsurge in Scottish playwriting in the late twentieth century.

Selected and introduced by Alasdair Cameron, the collection draws on adventurous theatres such as the Edinburgh Traverse and touring groups including Wildcat and 7:84, as well as looking further afield.

The plays included in this volume are:

Writer's Cramp by John Byrne (3m)
Debut play from the author of The Slab Boys.

Losing Venice by John Clifford (large cast)
A parable on the consequences of military adventuring.

The Letter-Box by Ann Marie Di Mambro (2f 1m)
A short play about a woman who's been thrown out of her flat.

Saturday at the Commodore by Rona Munro (1f)
A woman remembers a painful teenage betrayal.

Elizabeth Gordon Quinn by Chris Hannan (4f 5m)
Modern classic about an indomitable woman fighting to retain her dignity during the Glasgwegian rent-strikes of 1915. A revised 2006 version is available in a separate edition.

Dead Dad Dog by John McKay (2m)
A short comedy about a trendy young Scotsman pursued by the ghost of his dad.

The Steamie by Tony Roper (4f 1m)
Celebrates women's work in a Glasgow wash-house.

Paperback, 275 pages ISBN: 9781854590176Publication Date:
3 May 1990
Size: 197mm x 130mm£10.99 £8.79You save £2.20 (20%)
Similar Titles
A modern classic about the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots, and her cousin and fellow ruler, Elizabeth I...
A collection of nine very different short plays by three remarkable generations of Scottish writers, ideal performanc...
A collection of seven plays by Scottish writers, selected and introduced by Philip Howard, artistic director of Edinb...
Five plays from the the makar (national poet) of Scotland, one of the country's best-known - and best-loved - living...
A panoramic history of modern Scottish theatre, reported from the frontline by Scotland's leading drama critic.