A Doll's House, Part 2

Performing rights not held by Nick Hern Books

Paperback, 144 pages ISBN: 9781559365826Publication Date:
19 Sep 2019
Size: 215mm x 135mm£14.99
First Staged:
South Coast Repertory, California, & John Golden Theatre, Broadway, 2017

A Doll's House, Part 2

By Lucas Hnath

Paperback £14.99

It has been fifteen years since Nora Helmer slammed the door on her stifling domestic life, when a knock comes at that same door. It is Nora, and she has returned with an urgent request. What will her sudden return mean to those she left behind?

Lucas Hnath's funny, probing, and bold play is both a continuation of Ibsen's complex exploration of traditional gender roles, and a sharp contemporary take on the struggles inherent in all human relationships across time.

A Doll's House, Part 2 premiered at the South Coast Repertory, California, in April 2017, before transferring to Broadway at the John Golden Theatre.

Press Quotes

'Smart, funny and utterly engrossing… This unexpectedly rich sequel reminds us that houses tremble and sometimes fall when doors slam, and that there are living people within, who may be wounded or lost… Mr. Hnath has a deft hand for combining incongruous elements to illuminating ends'

Ben Brantley - New York Times

'Hnath's play is less a conventional sequel than a thought experiment inspired by the original. Luckily, Hnath is no mean thinker... Provocatively, the play functions as both homage and riposte, casting a critical eye on Nora's choices and trying to wrestle with their consequences... Hnath writes fast, vibrant dialogue – much of it in a salty, modern vernacular'

Guardian

Performing rights not held by Nick Hern Books

Paperback, 144 pages ISBN: 9781559365826Publication Date:
19 Sep 2019
Size: 215mm x 135mm£14.99

Also by Lucas Hnath:

The Christians

Go to author page...

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